Furry Book Month Publisher Q&A: Weasel Press


Today we talk to Izzy of Weasel Press to see what some of the challenges and pleasures are when producing furry content, especially with a more erotic or horror twist.


Tell us a little bit about yourself, and the publisher you are representing.

My name is Izzy, also known as Weasel. I’m an aspiring dildosmith, poet, gaymer, and the owner of Weasel Press and everything housed underneath it.

What is your favourite thing about the furry fandom?

I’m tempted to use the Marge Simpson meme of “I just think it’s neat!” But honestly there’s a lot of self-expression, whether it’s SFW or NSFW. That freedom to be able to discover yourself through your own character, through your friends, your art, etc – it’s very punk.

What made you decide to get involved with the furry publishing scene?

That’s a hard question. I’m mostly a publisher of poetry and horror. When I ventured into furry, I didn’t even know what I wanted to publish. Furry was becoming more a part of my life, so I figured it was time to venture in. I got some good experiences, some misses, it’s been an interesting ride to say the least.

What do you believe makes a good story?

Character. As people we’re so flawed at everything. As a writing, knowing how to exploit those flaws makes for some really good stories. You could have the most interesting world, or plot, but if you’re character is poorly written or even just mediocre, the rest will fall apart.

What are some of the biggest challenges with publishing in a relatively niche market?

Honestly, it’s money. I don’t want this to sound woe is me or some shit, but with lack of sales it makes it difficult for me to want to continue publishing in furry. I’m unemployed at the moment, so the press is on the tightest of rope.

What are some of the best parts of publishing furry books?

The best part of publishing for me is the formatting/layout design. I can do that all day, honestly.

What is the ideal writer to work with like?

I don’t have an ideal writer. I prefer to get a long with most folx, unless they’re problematic in some way. There are very few folx that I won’t work with.

Novels vs Anthologies. Which do you prefer working on, and how do they compare in terms of sales?

I love anthologies for the variety, but they’re a complete money pit. You can put in $500-$600 but make a few bucks back. Maybe others have more positive experiences, and I think that’s great. At this point in time, I can’t afford them.

What do you believe is the biggest misconception about the process of publishing, either specific to furry publishing or generally?

I generally try to lay out the process for folx when they reach out to Weasel Press. I’m not always on top of my game. Running an entire publishing house and being only 1 person doesn’t help either, lol! I think most folx believe publishing the book is a lot faster than it actually is. But aside from that, I don’t typically have issues with authors I work with.

It’s always said “don’t judge a book by its cover”, but just how important is cover art to the success of a book?

The whole design of your cover is important. You want good art, good typesetting/font design, good back cover descriptions and blurbs. If your book cover looks like shit, it may get meme attention, but it won’t help your book. If you need help with your cover, Fiverr is a good affordable resource.

Is there anything you would like to see more of in furry fiction?

More horror, but I think it’s slowly on the rise!

What has been your favourite book to work on recently? Why?

#ohmurr! Is always a treat to work on. Pulling together several communities, from furry to pup/pony/pet play, to toy and gear makers, it’s a place where folx can read a fun story, or learn something new, or maybe even just find a maker that has toys that work better for them. I’m happy to ride this train for as long as it lasts.


Tomorrow we return to one of our authors, who did a reading of her upcoming release at Oxfurred Comma. We hope you’ll come by again to see what she has to say.

Furry Book Month Author Q&A: G.C. Stargazer


Today we speak to G.C. Stargazer and see what she has to say about furry writing and how she produces her serialised fiction series.


Tell us a little bit about your most recent project (written or published). Was there a particular inspiration for it?

Well! I recently had finished my latest serial and one of my readers comment about how they’d like to see the male lead before the relationship. He was a private investigator in the story so now I’m trying my paw at writing a down on his luck, investigator ala noir style in a modern setting. Coincidentally it’ll just be a for fun thing I throw out there, no sex in it, just a little side-story for my fans.

Full-on projects, I’m working on constructing my first paid romance novella called Wanderlust. I’ve also got an action-adventure title that’s more or less done and just waiting on the cover art. Like most of my work, it is adult though, however, both titles involve human and anthro characters, not just strictly furry.

What is your favorite thing about the furry fandom? Why write furry fiction?

Humans are boooooring! Joking aside, there are so many fun things you can do with furry fiction that simply wouldn’t work with humans. Case in point in one of my stories two detectives were investigating an area and could pick up the scent of another suspect they had spoken with lingering in the area. You couldn’t do that with humans. To say nothing of what you can do with sex scenes.

What is your writing process like? Do you outline and plot, or are you a “pantser”?

You kidding? I’m a full-blown pantser in every way. Hell, I don’t know what I’m writing until I sit down and do it most times. Outlines, grand sweeping plot points? Phhtt… I surprise myself and guide the story how my muse wants it done. I do have some inklings of how I want things to go sometimes, but most of it is pure chaos and I love it, it’s like I create it, but I also don’t really know for sure the outcome myself, so it’s the best of both worlds.

What do you consider your biggest strength as a writer?

Probably my ability to keep most of the threads of the plot intact within my own brain. I never make notes, but I do tend to keep the important bits in the memory banks to keep things flowing properly. I do a LOT of proofreading and self-editing though, so everything I write gets burned into my skull.

What is your favorite kind of story to write? Does it align well with what you like to read?

Romance with sex. Not cheesy smutty paperback stuff, no I mean full-on romance with love, passion, hopes, dreams, etc… I don’t want to write characters just banging usually, I want them to feel it, I want there to be emotion and drive behind the act. It does not align with what I read because I don’t read much as a hobby. I’m a creator not a consumer and that is probably a major fault of mine.

Which character of yours do you most identify with, and why?

All of them, there’s a little bit of my heart in every single one from the villains to the heroes. If I had to pick a single one though? Hmm… Probably Sarnai from my Blood & Carrots serial. She’s a vampire stricken with nightmares that are slowly driving her insane and I can totally relate to that since it’s an affliction I’ve had since childhood. Granted it’s also given me crazy inspirations at times, but yeah. Mmm… that might have gotten a little too gloomy, anyway, she’s also moody, vengeful, and super protective of her loved ones, viciously so at times. These are all traits(faults) I myself tend to have.

Which authors or specific books have most influenced your work?

None, I don’t consume much written work or media in general and even less am I influenced by it. The last novel I cracked open and read cover to cover was a Louis L’Amour one, so let’s go with him since I was big on western-style stories as a kid.

What is the last book you read that you really love?

My own. Seriously, even if it sounds vain. I adore my own work and I re-read it just for fun sometimes. I’ve tried reading newer material but I just can’t get into it, I don’t agree with the pacing or a choice the author made, and the whole experience is ruined, so I never finish it. I’m a brat when it comes to what I like/want.

Besides writing, how do you like to spend your free time?

Hmm… I’m a bit of a mixed bag. I like going out doing nature stuff like hiking, I also enjoy gaming with my partner. Sometimes I’ll just chill with my partner and watch sports, I don’t really watch any tv or movies outside of that though, in fact, by and large, I avoid movies and tv shows like the plague.

Do you have any advice to give other writers?

Every, single, day. Do something. Write, proofread, edit, or just read your own junk over again. Do SOMETHING in that vein of your creativity every single day until they put you in the dirt.

Is there anything you would like to see more of within furry fiction?

Ho ho… this might tweak a few tails, but alright. You know what I wanna see more of? Heterosexual and lesbian-style romance stories. REAL romance stories, not smutty little sex fics. We as a community are drowning in boylove and I adore it, I love me some good boy-on-boy stuff, but the market is swamped in it and all I can do is roll my eyes and sigh when I see another one.

Where can readers find your work?

My FA and Patreon have all my past and present serials in them. My paid works will be released later this year, probably to Amazon, then when they ban me for knots, some of the other furry publishers hopefully. :3

https://www.furaffinity.net/user/g.c.stargazer/

https://www.patreon.com/gcstargazer


Tomorrow we have another one of our publishers giving some insight into the community. We hope you’ll be back then to learn a bit more about them.

Furry Book Month Author Q&A: Kyell Gold


Kyell Gold is arguably one of the most successful names in the furry writing community, and he is always happy to share his knowledge with the community. At Oxfurred Comma, he discussed the importance of a supportive writing group. Today, he answered some more general questions about furry writing.


Tell us a little bit about your most recent project (written or published). Was there a particular inspiration for it?

I recently finished a first draft of my fantasy novel The Price of Thorns, which has been kicking around in my head in one form or another for probably a decade. I can’t think of a particular inspiration for that first idea, but when I started seriously writing it last year, one of the things I added was my love of fairy tales and folk tales. This world is one where magic exists, but fairy tales and folk tales still serve the same purpose, of teaching people lessons about the world. The tales in this world just might happen to be a little more true than they are in ours.

What is your favourite thing about the furry fandom? Why write furry fiction?

Those are two separate questions, really. My favorite thing about the furry fandom is the community and all the people in it, who are 99% fantastic and fun to know. I’ve met my partners and many of my best friends through the fandom and I love being part of it. So I guess I write furry fiction partly to give back to that community, but really I write furry fiction because I love to think about anthro critters. That’s all.

What is your writing process like? Do you outline and plot, or are you a “pantser”?

I have drifted toward outlining and plot since I started writing novels and now do that for most of my projects, though there are occasional “pantsing” projects. Even for those, though, I usually have an idea of where I want the story to go.

What do you consider your biggest strength as a writer?

My work ethic.

What is your favourite kind of story to write? Does it align well with what you like to read?

I don’t know if I have a favorite! I love fantasy, I love contemporary stories, I love historical fiction. The Dangerous Spirits series blended all those with supernatural stories, which I also love, so maybe those are my favorite. I like strongly character-focused stories in general, and those are also what I like to read, although I also like non-fiction and mysteries (which tend to be less character-focused). My favorite stories from childhood are all fantasy and maybe that’s where my heart is, but as long as I can relate to the characters, I can lose myself in a story.

Which character of yours do you most identify with, and why?

They’re all part of me in one way or another.

Which authors or specific books have most influenced your work?

Stephen King for sure. Madeleine L’Engle. Susan Cooper’s Dark is Rising series. Kazuo Ishiguro, specifically The Remains of the Day, A Pale View of Hills, and Never Let Me Go. David Mitchell’s work is all influential.

What is the last book you read that you really love?

David Mitchell’s Utopia Avenue.

Besides writing, how do you like to spend your free time?

Doing more writing. Failing that, I hang out with my family, read, watch movies/shows, and sometimes do database work for fun.

Do you have any advice to give other writers?

Make sure that you are making a story that you are happy with, and if you are happy with it, don’t worry about what anyone else thinks. (But do be receptive to constructive criticism, and always be learning.)

Is there anything you would like to see more of within furry fiction?

If there is, I usually tend to go ahead and write it.

Where can readers find your work?

Most of it is on sale through Furplanet.com and Sofawolf.com (print), and BadDogBooks.com (e-book). I have a website (kyellgold.com) and a Substack newsletter (kyellgold.substack.com) where people can read about books I have out and books coming up.


Tomorrow we speak to another one of our fantastic writers. We hope you’ll come back then!

Furry Book Month Publisher Q&A: Thurston Howl Publications


Today we speak to Cedric G! Bacon of Thurston Howl Publications. As always, the publishers of the furry writing community are able to provide a different perspective compared to the authors. We hope you’ll give this all a read to discover what Cedric thinks of the community.


Tell us a little bit about yourself, and the publisher you are representing.

My name is Cedric G! Bacon, in some fandom circles I go by “Batced”. I’ve been writing for many years but maybe for the fandom I’ve been writing for just a little over five years, first appearing in the anthology Furry Trash. The publisher I represent is Thurston Howl Publications as the chief or head publisher in charge of things yonder there.

What is your favourite thing about the furry fandom?

I think it’s the communal aspect of the furry fandom, where everybody helps each other out in terms of creating fan-driven works. Its sort of like how I imagine the early science fiction scenes in the 1930s first developed and worked towards making that a much larger fandom than it was at the very beginning. And I feel like that with the combination of the different writers, artists, fursuit makers, musicians, and everything else I’m probably blanking on, they all do like the Beatles and come together and make this beautiful, loving thing that entertains others and inspires others.

I’ve been one of those writers who loved getting my words in a book and even getting a contributor copy was well enough for me. I looked at it as great practice because everyone involved in publishing might not have been professionals per se, but everyone involved were veterans who knows what they’re doing and I figured if I was ever going to send something in out of the fandom and into the mainstream to be looked at, I felt more comfortable getting that practice and learning the mechanics and getting the confidence and I feel like the fandom publishers have been very good for that.

Making money is great and all but I think I prefer making sure I’m good enough to get to that next step as a professional writer and can put my mouth behind those words instead of making demands. And the fandom presses are very good for that, because everyone I’ve ever worked with since coming into this have kicked my butt every step of the way, making sure those words would be good enough and there are times when either the editor or the publisher personally said to me to make changes because sometimes I would write something extreme, I took it as advice that would help me. The small nature of the fandom is very good at sharpening some great creators and that’s something I wouldn’t change for the world.

What made you decide to get involved with the furry publishing scene?

I sort of fell into it. I wanted to always help out Thurston Howl since I was typically in contact with them and wanted to help get books out there and released. But in truth I always wanted to be involved in some way with publishing, always hoping to one day get on up to be employed by DC Comics or Marvel, or even Tokyopop or Viz Media.

None of those came to pass so even with helping out with a small press publisher in the furry writing scene, it was still important and I felt like I was able to learn about organizing, how to commission covers, working with writers, editing especially, and even learning how to work with others and be on that end of creating good things.

This last I was always so nervous about because I’d be the first to say that I am always pretty nervous when even talking with close friends and having to be the bearer of bad news. Occasionally it has been to my detriment and as I discovered there’s no easy way of balancing it, but at the end of it I just realize the best I can do is my best.

What do you believe makes a good story?

Solid characters and something resembling a storyline if that thing we call “plot” is absent. It is possible to tell a tale without following the standard procedure of a plot, especially if you’re weaving something that has events happening to the characters. One of my favorites that did this was a story from Alice “Huskyteer” Dryden entitled “Little Sun” that appeared in Werewolves Versus Space. While the “plot” is all about the discovery that a little stray dog is more than she appears, there are exterior forces that happen to every character that changes the force of the story across each turn (this story I ridiculously love and encourage everyone to seek it out) without hitting the reader over the head with details.

Another one is Kyell Gold’s “Don’t Blink”, which I suppose is part of his Forester universe (since the League of Canids first appeared in Waterways but please feel free to correct me on this anyone!) which has a small plot but the focus is all about young superhero Blink Coyote and his relationships and worries that he’s a lot less than he really is, and its just a really lovely story that showcases low stakes, but important events to the characters that will change and shape them by story’s end.

What are some of the biggest challenges with publishing in a relatively niche market?

Perhaps the struggle I’ve discovered is finding a way to generate interest, hold vested interest, and reach newer readers. Sometimes that means looking out beyond the niche market and dipping a toe into the scary realm of the mainstream, and with some of our THP titles there’s a fair few that I think would provide some interest to readers outside the bubble. But I think there is also the risk of explaining what furry is to those who only know about it because of what they saw on CSI or Aqua Teen Hunger Force some fifteen, twenty years ago, and that’s the perception they have whenever anyone mentions the word “furry” in a conversation meant to be taken seriously.

And I have to spotlight a lot of hard work from those like Mary E. Lowd (publisher of Zooscape magazine) and my predecessor at THP, founder Thurston Howl (who shepherded and edited the Furries Among Us trilogy of essays that feature conversations about the fandom and topics that involve the fandom) for making furry far less of a joke and something that can be spoken of when breaking out into different markets.

What are some of the best parts of publishing furry books?

As much as I spoke about that fear of hurting friends’ feelings when it comes to publishing, the part that I do enjoy is that creation process. That’s showing them what all has been happening on the production end, getting feedback, working with them on shaping the book, finding out ways of reaching potential new readers, and even working with them in terms of the marketing. But I think it’s the satisfaction of seeing them happy and satisfied at the end of it when the book is realized and released, and they are happy. That makes me happy and makes all the stress, anxiety, insomnia, and worry worth it at the end.

What is the ideal writer to work with like?

Truthfully, any writer that is like a tag partner with the editor or publisher, working with them each step of the way and offering up ideas they may have is ideal for me. I always look at it as a team project, a saga…a journey even that we all have to take together and it just makes it harder if there isn’t wide communication, understanding, compassion, and patience because none of this can get done in a day, but it goes faster when we’re all working and doing what needs to be done.

Novels vs Anthologies. Which do you prefer working on, and how do they compare in terms of sales?

Probably novels, which is ironic for me because I’ve cut my teeth (to use the old, esoteric phrase) doing anthologies but novels, being a linear expression of a singular author’s idea and voice, allows me to explore things to really bring the best out of the work. In terms of sales, there’s no easy way of saying what sells better or worse, as there are a lot of outlying factors like genres, specific authors connected to the book, and even times of the season. One book could inconceivably sell better than the one that is expected to be a huge hit, and there’s usually no logic to why. But the bottom line for me is I always go in hoping for the best with each title, putting in 110% in production and believing each one is going to be a hit with readers, and even when they aren’t, if one person really likes it and it speaks to them, that is a hit to me.

What do you believe is the biggest misconception about the process of publishing, either specific to furry publishing or generally?

The big one I’ve encountered makes me think of the old saying “All hat and no cattle”. It means talking boastfully as if they are some Waldo P. Emerson Jones (reference to an old song from the cartoon band the Archies) and engaging in no action whatsoever, and it pertains to those who believe that publishers in the furry fandom are just like the big type publishers and command and pull-down huge amounts of money annually off the backs of writers. And to that I say its quite easy for them to say all that sitting on the sidelines but for those who are actually on the field getting tackled every day with many issues they encounter with things such as production, formatting, time, help, and printing. All of which is coming more out of the publisher’s pocket than those who criticize tend to realize, calling it all “vanity presses”. It’d be vanity presses if, say, publishers were well-off like John D. Rockefeller and could just throw money at everything.

There was one particularly vocal critic who was trying to whip up static by claiming fandom publishers were “predators” for paying writers less than their worth and making it sound like writers needed to charging more for their value and time, which I feel like any publisher in this fandom badly wishes could happen and there are many efforts to make it so, but the individual did not seem to want to be sympathetic, as calling everyone involved in publishing a “predator” and just generally being insulting to folks who ran presses for many years that did have to give it all up made me wonder if this critic had ever interacted with or even worked on that business end to really know the stresses and how difficult it is monetarily on anyone.

It’s always said “don’t judge a book by its cover”, but just how important is cover art to the success of a book?

Very! I truly have the hardest time imagining what would be the most appealing to the eye and sometimes I ask the writer what they imagine. I know personally I judge many covers and then flip over to the back for the synopsis, which also to come across very well to make me make that final leap to the checkout lane and bringing a new book home.

Is there anything you would like to see more of in furry fiction?

I’m a big fan of superheroes so I would love to see more of that. Hopepunk (which I discovered recently, which is all about keep going no matter what!) is another that I more writers discover and write about.

What has been your favourite book to work on recently? Why?

Change In The Midnight Rain by Kageichi Kagi (illustrations by Jiroh Kinoshita) because it ticked off a bunch of things I always liked: anime/manga, light comedy, romance, historical fiction, and there was a good carrythrough throughout the novel about it not being who or what your family is, as long as there is love there because at the end of it, like the Beatles said, all you need is love.


We hope you’ll check out Thurston Howl Publications, and the great books they publish. (Or their Bound Tales imprint). They have a great range of books with a particular focus towards erotica and horror.

Tomorrow we speak to one of the most successful furry writers. We hope you’ll come back and see what he has to say.

Furry Book Month Author Q&A: P.C. Hatter


Now that we’re hopefully all recovered from Oxfurred Comma, we discuss furry writing with author P.C. Hatter.


Tell us a little bit about your most recent project (written or published). Was there a particular inspiration for it?

Poached Parodies is my latest project. While reading some of my old favourites for inspiration, I thought, what if the character was a tiger? It went crazy from there.

Few people are old enough to remember Mike Hammer, Philip Marlowe, or Sam Spade. If the names are recognized, it’ll probably be from the movies. I love these old greats and wanted to bring the noir detective into the furry realm with a tiger, a husky, and four different lizards.

The job of parodying these old stories required a bit of thought with some updating and context for the modern reader. Not to mention explaining how an anthropomorphic world with multiple species might work.

Private Detective Kaiser Wrench is definitely a tiger with a code of honor, yet still holds onto what society considers barbaric tendencies. While it’s dangerous to be his friend, he’ll be sure to avenge your death.

Lucius Anoraq is a lone Siberian husky who says he isn’t paid to care but is really a softy at heart. Though whether he’ll find the dream male he’ll want to spend the rest of his life with remains to be seen.

The lizards of the last books vary in their professions, but still get sucked into a mystery. From gangsters to diabolical killers and a feme-fatal these lizards need to find the killers while saving their tails.

The original plan went a little haywire with 2020, but with the resurgence of conventions this three-part project is well underway with the first part being completed with the thirteen-volume set of Kaiser Wrench completed and up for sale. Part two contains Lucius Anoraq seven volumes and will be complete and up for sale by November 2021. The third part, Lizard Fifth’s five volumes will be available 2022,

What is your favourite thing about the furry fandom? Why write furry fiction?

Just about everything. My husband and I love the creativity in all its forms. Not just the writing but the artwork, fursuits, music, and more. And everyone is so nice.

Why write furry fiction? Because I love the fandom. So does my husband. He’s written a few adorable short stories. We’re working on the third book of the Kawokee together. It was supposed to be out 2020 but life gets in the way and hope to have it done by 2022.

When you think of it, using a tail wag, ear twitch, or any other thing associated with a particular species is both a challenge and pleasure to bring to a page.

What is your writing process like? Do you outline and plot, or are you a “pantser”?

Process? What process? Yes, I’m the dreaded Pantser. No plan, just an idea driven at sixty miles an hour toward a possibility. Sometimes I’ll dig myself a hole just to see if I can get out of it. Sometimes that requires someone to die first, and they’re usually my favourite characters.

Hubby is the Plotter. This makes writing stories together rather interesting because I keep messing up his organization ideas with my crazy notions.

What do you consider your biggest strength as a writer?

Imagination is a writer’s biggest strength. A person can learn to spell or write a coherent sentence even if that requires finding the right teacher who can help you with whatever is holding you back. That’s what I had to do. A person can also learn a lot just by reading. Some things are gene specific, so if when planning to write a certain gene, read. Then sit back and let your imagination run wild.

What is your favourite kind of story to write? Does it align well with what you like to read?

What I like write is about as eclectic as what I like to read. Though I’m better at somethings than others. Science fiction was my first love both in reading and writing. While I like a good cozy mystery, I’m not very good at writing it. As for pure romance, neither reading nor writing it interest me.

Which character of yours do you most identify with, and why?

For this question we’ll have to go back to my pre-furry writing. Kane the main character in Ursa Kane would probably be the one I most related to at one time. Originally, the story was not supposed to be published because it was more divorce therapy than story. But I found it hiding on my hard drive, and my publisher at the time loved it. Grim of Emerald Tears reflects more of a dark time, but for any of my newer works, don’t usually put my entirety into the characters. Except for Purple Cat. The character is not only from a series of fifty-two short stories used on my blog, but also my fursona. Who knows, the collection just might wind up on the table someday.

Which authors or specific books have most influenced your work?

For Love of Mother Not by Alan Dean Foster. In fact, the entire Flinx series with its rich worldbuilding had a lot of influence. Piers Anthony and the first few books of his Xanth series was another wonderful author. Without either of these two writers, things would have been quite different.

What is the last book you read that you really love?

For a nonfurry book, that would have to be Dune. Yes, I finally read the book after how many years? Most people can’t pull off such a giant info-dump on how a world works, but Frank Herbert made it interesting.

For a furry works, there are several good authors, but my favourite is still Sylvain St-Peirre’s Death by Predation series for his view of how an anthropomorphic world would work. Then there’s several works by Frances Pauli that I like. She managed to make me like giant spiders.

Besides writing, how do you like to spend your free time?

Dancing, gardening, tatting, RPG, and talking with friends. When not engrossed in reading a book.

Do you have any advice to give other writers?

Write because you love it. Not for the money, there’s easier ways of making money.

Know your audience. If you’re just writing for yourself, you already know the story. If you’re writing for someone else, know and understand what they want or expect.

The author doesn’t come with the book. Make sure the writing is clear and understandable. This is where having a good Beta-reader is crucial.

Not everyone is going to love your stuff. It’s okay. Appreciate the people who do.

Is there anything you would like to see more of within furry fiction?

More safe for work writing. It’s out there, but sometimes it’s hard to find. People have told me they don’t read furry because of the sex and many are surprised when we tell them our books are PG-13. Neither I nor my hubby can write a sex scene to save our lives, but neither are we interested in reading about it. Call us old fogies if you wish, but we’re more interested in the stories.

Where can readers find your work?

Amazon is the easiest place to find the books outside a convention.

The author page is https://www.amazon.com/Stacy-Bender/e/B008GW2OYE

The special edition of Kawokee is available at https://ringtailcafe.com/

To find out about new books or what convention we’ll be at, try the website or blog.

https://www.stacybender.net/

http://www.blog.stacybender.net/


We hope you’ll have a look through those links – you never know, you might find your next favourite book!
Tomorrow we’ll be speaking to one of our publishers, who definitely has a lot to share!

Furry Book Month Author Q&A: Copper Sphynx


Oxfurred Comma may be over, but our celebration of furry authors is not! We have so many interesting voices in the furry writing community, and today’s author is no exception to that!


Tell us a little bit about your most recent project (written or published). Was there a particular inspiration for it?

My most recent project is a furry slice-of-life/rom-com graphic novel. The inspiration came from a rumor when I was in high school during the 90s. The rumor was so intriguing that I kept it as an idea, started to draft it in the early 2000s, but kept putting it down to start anew. 2018 is the umpteenth time but I now consider an official draft. I also returned to my Tabber the Red works, what I call my Cat Fantasy/Sword & Sorcery short story series.

What is your favourite thing about the furry fandom? Why write furry fiction?

The fact I can have serious discussions with folks from all walks of life about one of my favorite genres is one dream come true I did not see happening. When one grows up as an 80s child, there wasn’t a lack of stories as cartoons, both weekdays and Saturday mornings, that did not involve talking animals and anthro animals as protagonists. I write furry fiction since these were many of the stories that touched me as a child and inspired me as a pre-teen to tell my own stories “when I grew up”.

What is your writing process like? Do you outline and plot, or are you a “pantser”?

I’ve gotten better with outlining and plotting over the years but I still consider myself a pantser by the fact that I get an idea, a scene, or a conversation, write it out, and if the story progresses, I begin to outline further into that scene and/or conversation. I plot and subplot for the overall story itself.

What do you consider your biggest strength as a writer?

Dialogue. Monologues. Conversations within a crowd. Readers often tell me it is my internal monologues or dialogues between characters that pull them into my stories. It’s why if I’m doubting myself or I can’t figure out a particular scene, I start with dialogue.

What is your favourite kind of story to write? Does it align well with what you like to read?

The underdog, the social outcast, or the pariah as the protagonist. I enjoy reading stories outside my cultural and faith background. When I read multicultural stories, I don’t feel so lonely in the world. I also like stories where the feminine is not derided but celebrated. I love and respect the Romance genre and like that it’s cropping up in more Speculative Fiction. I also enjoy Adventure and Comedy. Though I can’t stand real-life political machinations, politics make the world go round and I enjoy stories when political situations are woven well into the worldbuilding.

Which character of yours do you most identify with, and why?

I often identify most whatever I’m currently working on. In one of my non-furry science fiction series, two published by Kyanite Press/Publishing, I identify strongly with my human psychic, Catriona, who shares my initials but cultural background. She is intuitive, introverted, and socially awkward though, unlike me, she’s a successful business person. In my current work-in-progress graphic novel, my furry protagonist, Yanina, shares my artistic and writing background. She was bullied back in school, yet, like me, books and her creative life saved her.

Which authors or specific books have most influenced your work?

First, comics, comic strips, comic books, graphic novels, and webcomics from the US and abroad. Dell Yearling(middle-grade novels) imprint, Harlequin Romances, Tor Books, Del Rey SFF, Avon SFF and Romance, and organized crime books.

What is the last book you read that you really love?

Toritan by Kotetsuko Yamamoto, a duology manga about a 20-something gay Japanese man working as an investigator who ends up doing odd jobs for his neighbors and community. He’s able to understand birds and talk to them! There’s also a first-time romance in the story. I love how the local birds interacted with him and had different personalities!

Besides writing, how do you like to spend your free time?

Cartoons, animations, classic films, SFF movies, sitcoms both here and overseas, Anime, Asian and Asian-American media. Right now, I’m reading even more webcomics and ebooks because of the pandemic. I also enjoy Japanese movies and South Korean dramas. However, if I’m able to watch shows and movies from other regions such as Southeast Asia, Africa, the Middle-east, and Eastern Europe with the help of subtitles, I don’t complain.

Do you have any advice to give other writers?

Read broadly, read widely, and read outside one’s comfort levels. I’ve seen my writing and storytelling grow because I tried out books I might not have read otherwise. It’s why, though Furry, Science Fiction/Fantasy, Romance, and comic books are my go-to’s, I can read other genres comfortably. Also, try out the prompts, the challenges, and keep journals/notebooks/diaries. One never knows that a past idea scrap may solve a future plot hole or get that next story idea.

Is there anything you would like to see more of within furry fiction?

A spec-fic writer asked for more than just the Hero’s Journey in his science fiction. I offered a blog by another spec-fic author with a Jewish-Korean background. On her blog, she mentions how Korean storytelling differs from Western storytelling. She also gave other cultural storytelling examples. I’ve been doing myself a favor to read more myths and folklore from as many cultures as I can find and access. Also, and I *think* I mentioned this on my blog, but my first published piece, which was my FIRST Furry story “Su Ling” was influenced a Tang Dynasty short story. I want for Furry fiction as for other favorite genres: more writers from different cultural backgrounds/experiences  which may bring more variety in storytelling structures and more cultural coding in furry characters.

Where can readers find your work?

You can find direct links to my writings and official publication list at The Angry Goblin @ – http://theangrygoblin.wordpress.com and my website at Tabber the Red @ – http://www.tabberthered.com


Check back tomorrow for an interview with another one of the many great writers in the fandom.

Furry Book Month Author Q&A: KC Alpinus


We hope you keep tuning in to Oxfurred Comma, but also check out this Q&A from KC Alpinus, who you may have heard in her two panels this weekend. Have a read of what she has to say about furry writing here, and catch up on the recordings if you missed her earlier!


Tell us a little bit about your most recent project (written or published). Was there a particular inspiration for it?

There are two most recent projects that I’ve worked on: the first is for the Hades Game. It was a fanzine for the character Ares, and I wrote two pieces of SFW/NSFW stuff for them. As for the inspiration for them, eh, there was a little inspiration looking at the personification of war and how the individual may devote their life to war and conquest, but unless they’re extremely influential, they’re rarely remembered.

My second piece is something that I’ve been persuaded to probably flip around into a novella. I wrote it in about 3 hours while dealing with my condition, so, naturally, I thought it was going to be hot garbage. Thankfully, my peers thought it was pretty good. It chronicles a dragon who loses her ability to fly, when flying is her defining feature. There actually is some inspiration behind this that deals with recovery and not only accepting disability, but working through that acceptance without people trying to turn you into “disability/inspiration porn”.

What is your favourite thing about the furry fandom?

The fantasy and escapist elements. I was the quintessential nerd through my primary school years, so braces, glasses, love of books, and highly intelligent (read: “socially awkward”), which automatically put a bullseye on me because I was “weird” to my peers. I wasn’t interested in the things like clothes, make-up, and boybands, but I loved collecting animal figures and creating stories for them. I then moved to wolf roleplays and found the fandom through them. I just loved the idea of being able to think of anthropomorphic figures with unique stories or dressing up as a tiger, a dragon, or a dhole and getting into that headspace. Now, this isn’t to say that the fandom does not have an issue with BIPOC people and women, but that’s a discussion for a different time.

Why write furry fiction?

Why not? I mean, yeah, there are some stories where I want to write humans, as in the case of my nerdy-but-streetwise necromancer teen Jazz, but other times, I want to explore some themes with anthropomorphic animals, like a dragon or an ancient saber-toothed goddess who needs to learn to let go of the illusion of control.

What is your writing process like?

I need to write like I need to breathe. Stories are always coming to me, whether I’m planning to write or whether I want to or not. So, my writing process usually starts with an idea, like “what if an ancient creature is transported to a different land and wreaks havoc there? What if the creatures being terrorized were rabbits? What if these rabbits could wield swords?” So, after I start brainstorming, I get these questions down and begin coming up with the right character. Depending on the story I want to tell, I also sketch out their flaws that will add some tension and conflict to the story. For example, when I wrote “Scorned” in Inhuman Acts, I wanted to create a PI who was a drunk and not the kind of character that you would necessarily root for, but you could kind of understand why they were so rough around the edges. Thus, Maltese, my maltese tigress was born. “Malty” has been through the wringer with her cases, but she fit the type of story that I was trying to write. So once I have a character and a pretty abstract idea of where I want the story to go, or at least the ending, I begin “talking” to my characters. I visualize them in my mind and I get a feel for their personalities and try to see how they feel about their experience. I try to really get inside of their heads and move from there. The more alive they feel to me, the more in-depth I can make their stories. I try to make them come as alive for my readers as they are for me.

Do you outline and plot, or are you a “pantser”?

I’m a “plantser” in that I will create the bare bones of an outline and plot because I tend to wander and take forever to finish a story if I don’t, but as far as interactions, emotional beats, and all of that good stuff, I like to go wherever the character and spirit of the plot take me.

What do you consider your biggest strength as a writer?

Emotional impact. I like writing stories that have things that will stick with the reader long after they’ve put down the anthology because they emotionally resonated with them.

What is your favourite kind of story to write?

I love stories that are fantastical and happy, but the ones that I seem to excel at are the bittersweet ones. I like my stories to end on a sad but hopeful note.

Does it align well with what you like to read?

Come to think of it, it actually does. The stories that come to mind are Gideon the Ninth by Tamsyn Muir, Alistair Reynold’s “Zima Blue”, Ken Liu’s “The Paper Menagerie”, Ursula Vernon’s “Poccasin”, or Bruce Coville’s “The Passing of the Pack” or his entire anthology, Oddly Enough.

 Which character of yours do you most identify with, and why?

Taisa, my little pitbull puppy in “No Dogs”. She’s a combination of myself and my niece. Sometimes, I do wish that I was a bit more like Asthar, my saber-toothed hunting goddess.

Which authors or specific books have most influenced your work?

Patricia McKissack’s The Dark Thirty, specifically “The Conjure Brother” and “Boo Mama”, K.A. Applegate’s Animorphs, L.A. Banks Neteru Series, Bruce Coville, Eden Royce, and more recently, Ursula Vernon’s short stories. (She also hugged me when I presented her with a Leo Award at Anthrocon 2018 and signed a book for my niece, so that was pretty cool.)

What is the last book you read that you really love?

Are you good furs really doing this? It’s like asking me to pick my most recent favorite sunrise (everyone that I see) or favorite grape (cotton candy or Moscato). But if you really want me to pick one, it would be Blood Like Magic, by Liselle Sambury. In Sambury’s world, witches of Voya’s family are given a task by their ancestors once they come of age. Once that task is complete, they are rewarded with a peculiar magical ability, which is often proportionate to the difficulty of the task. Voya is tasked with destroying the person that she loves to complete her task and she struggles with her decision.

This story hit home on so many levels because there is a lot of Black Girl Magic, but more importantly, her family has roots in the Southern USA but immigrated to Toronto. My family hails from Georgia and I moved to Calgary a few years ago for better opportunities. Also, now, during this time of great loss to me, it has been comforting to think that my family members and ancestors are still looking out for me and my family, as well as knowing that those I’ve lost will always be near to me. (Love you always, Mompard.)

Besides writing, how do you like to spend your free time?

When I’m not writing, I’m usually reading. I’m a bit slower at it because my chronic illness and chronic pain slow me down, but I love to read. I am also an avid video and board gamer. My current games are Spiritfarer and Gloomhaven, respectively. When I’m not doing those, I can be found painting mini-figures, putting together Zoids models, and traveling. Oh, and being a class clown with my brother. We’re pretty silly together.

Do you have any advice to give other writers?

Yes, keep reading and writing. Also, don’t let rejection or fear of rejection stop you from writing. It takes tough skin to keep going, but the world needs to hear your story.

Is there anything you would like to see more of within furry fiction?

Definitely more fantasy and non-cis male characters. I love cis-male characters, but furry literature has had a lot of cis male characters represented and I’d like to see others featured. Same with other sexualities that include bi, pan, aro/ace, and everyone else.

Where can readers find your work?

My work can be found on Goal Publications website (please drop them a line and pick up some good books. They employed me when no one else would), Furplanet, Armoured Fox Press, and possibly Sofawolf. I believe I’ve worked with or had a story published by every major furry publisher, so just ask for the red dhole!

Ta-ta for now!

Pet dholz, drink mead, and save the dhole.

Like please, save the dhole. 😀


Tomorrow has no more Oxfurred Comma content, but it does have another author Q&A! So please come back then and continue to support the wonderful furry authors.

Furry Book Month Author Q&A: NightEyes


Take a short break from Oxfurred Comma by having a read about what NightEyes has to say about furry writing – and don’t forget to come back tomorrow to hear his panels!


Tell us a little bit about your most recent project (written or published). Was there a particular inspiration for it?

I run where things take me sometimes, especially with short fiction. The last story I wrote for Patreon is called “The Forgotten God” and is based on an encounter a character I play in D&D had. I wanted to explore the concept of a god left alone for a long time, so I wrote my own version of the event. It didn’t turn out how I thought it would, but it was fun to explore the concept and the Dungeon Master enjoyed it.

My next short story is based on an offhand comment I made about space junk and an idea that came to me. I’ve been fitting that in while working on novel edits.

What is your favourite thing about the furry fandom? Why write furry fiction?

I enjoy the uniqueness of the fandom and the fact it lets you do your own thing in a way you define. Plus, it’s a welcoming queer space. I write furry fiction because animals fascinating me, and I love telling stories.

What is your writing process like? Do you outline and plot, or are you a “pantser”?

For short fiction, I’m a panster, but I realize there’s a limit of how far I can go with that. I can take a rough idea and knock out a quick story, but if it goes over 10,000 words, I need to use an outline. I have pantsed an entire novel, and it took me almost a decade to pull that into a coherent story.

I’m not saying there aren’t people out there who can pants a novel, but I can’t. With long work, I need to find some cohesion, and I’m planning to write a novella soon in Scrivener using an already written outline.

What do you consider your biggest strength as a writer?

That’s hard to say. I used to think I was a good plotter, but that might be me being overconfident. Persistence is what I’m aiming for, and that’s what I hoping I’m developing. You can always fix plotting or character issues in editing, but you can’t do that if you’re not getting yourself working.

What is your favourite kind of story to write? Does it align well with what you like to read?

I enjoy exploring, so I’m not sure I stick well to a specific genre with my writing. I will say my work is gayer than what I usually read, but I also try and read in the genre.

Which character of yours do you most identify with, and why?

I’ve created a lot of characters at this point, but I think Zayn from the novel I plan to release next year is my favorite. He goes through a lot in the book I haven’t gone through, but I also have always identified with the internal struggles he experiences. There was a period of my life where I went through some intense isolation similar to what Zayn has experienced, and that’s always given me a connection to the character. Zayn also has to work to overcome that, just like I did in my own life.

Which authors or specific books have most influenced your work?

Reading White Fang and a Call of the Wild by Jack London greatly influenced me as a kid. One of the first things I tried to write as a kid was a story similar to those. Reading Watts Martin’s Why Coyotes Howl as an adult was a seminal moment for me as a writer. I had read short stories before in school, but this book helped fix the idea of what short fiction I would like to write could be like.

What is the last book you read that you really love?

I thoroughly enjoyed A Wizard’s Guide to Defensive Baking by Ursula Vernon which I read earlier this year. There’s a lot to love about this book, and Ursula’s work is sheer joy to read.

Besides writing, how do you like to spend your free time?

I’m a fan of board games and D&D. I do some video gaming, but not as much as I used to. I also read, which is important for any writer to do.

Do you have any advice to give other writers?

I’m not sure there’s a single piece of advice I can give that’s useful to all writers. I’d suggest listening to the advice others give, but it’s important to realize that how you work may be different. Be cautious of anyone who tells you there is a set way of doing something because there seldom is. That’s the beauty of fiction. You can make it what you want it to be.

Is there anything you would like to see more of within furry fiction?

The publishing market has gotten tighter due to the pandemic, and I’d like to see that stabilize and grow. How to approach that issue though, I don’t know.

Where can readers find your work?

I have a website, nighteyes-dayspring.com that I try and I keep up to date with information. I’m also on Twitter as @wolfwithcoffee where you can find the latest about what I’m up to. I’m also on Patreon, Fur Affinity, and SoFurry.


Tomorrow may be the last day of Oxfurred Comma, but we’re only halfway through our Q&As! Tomorrow we speak to another furry writer – who will also have a couple of panels this weekend!

Furry Book Month Publisher Q&A: Goal Publications


Today we hear from Goal Publications. This interview took place before their recent news about their potential closure at the end of the year.
We hope you’ll have a read about what they think makes a good furry story, and what they have enjoyed about publishing furry books. Please consider supporting Goal in what may be their last few months – as any support to them will also help the wonderful writers they publish.


Tell us a little bit about yourself, and the publisher you are representing.

My name is Sean, and I’m the owner of Goal Publications. We are a queer-owned press located out of Connecticut, USA, and have published authors from five continents. We tend to focus on furry stories where the fact that these characters are animal-people makes some sort of difference in the story. This can be anything from a change in social customs, to clothing, to physical traits and abilities.

What is your favourite thing about the furry fandom?

The creativity in this fandom has never ceased to amaze me, whether its through writing, visual media, music, or something else entirely.

What made you decide to get involved with the furry publishing scene?

I’ve been editing freelance for over ten years now, starting within the furry fandom. From there it was a natural progression to working on editing anthologies, which turned into starting my webzine, which turned into starting a publishing house to contain that zine when it turned physical. That transition happened in 2015.

What do you believe makes a good story?

This is a hard question, because it’s such a subjective thing. That’s why so many of our decisions come down to “is it right for our market?”

As for something more tangible than that, a good story should first have something that establishes the setting, a main character, and some sort of stakes, all within the first few pages. More established authors can get away with a longer setup, but newer authors will need to earn the trust of their readers first. Give them something that lets them know they can expect some sort of payoff in the end.

What are some of the biggest challenges with publishing in a relatively niche market?

The biggest hurdle is the number of readers in a community that values visual media exponentially over written media, and thus the lack of sales. This forced us to be a lot more cautious with the books we do take, and the risks we take with it. Every financial decision we make is a gamble, from what book we take, the cover art we commission, the convention we choose to attend or not, etc. Any one of these decisions could be what forces us to close, all because reader-base isn’t guaranteed.

What are some of the best parts of publishing furry books?

I think this is where the niche market shines. We are able to more directly interact with the authors, editors, and readers than a larger market. It allows us to share how passionate we are about the titles and how proud of our authors and editors we are. It allows us to get to know our readers and be able to personally recommend titles. And it allows us to have more casual interactions with writers that could one day write a book for us.

What is the ideal writer to work with like?

An ideal writer for us would be one that both is open to criticism, while at the same time is willing to defend the parts of their work they feel strongly about. It creates a dialogue that, in the end, really does create the strongest story, and instils the most amount of trust between us.

Novels vs Anthologies. Which do you prefer working on, and how do they compare in terms of sales?

Novels all the way. With only one or two exceptions, novels far outweigh our anthologies in sales. They are also a lot easier for us to work on. Working on five 6,000-word short stories takes longer and is more draining for us than working on a 120k word novel, just because of the hard stops and starts involved (due to the different writing styles, different plots, just the different stories as a whole). Add this to the extra contracts and multiple authors… Team novel for sure.

What do you believe is the biggest misconception about the process of publishing, either specific to furry publishing or generally?

In general, the biggest misconception seems to be that authors send us in our stories, and we rake in all this money while authors are getting pennies. I can probably name the number of books we have on one hand that we aren’t underwater on.

Within the fandom, because we have a lot of authors not experienced working with editors, one of the biggest misconceptions I find is that authors think editors are there to take over their story—sometimes to the point of stealing it. That’s just not true, and those editors that try such a thing should flat-out not be editors.

It’s always said “don’t judge a book by its cover”, but just how important is cover art to the success of a book?

Covers are huge. Potentially customers are typically not even going to pick up a book to read more about it if they don’t find the cover appealing. It needs to fit the theme of the book, needs to attract the eye, and most importantly in this community, it has to have some sort of furry character on it. No furry character, and it’s very difficult to get those walking by at a convention or browsing the online catalog to stop and go further.

Is there anything you would like to see more of in furry fiction?

Furry fiction has become a lot more well-rounded in genre and general story styles than it has a few years ago, but one thing that has always been lacking is a larger spread of marginalized voices. This issue has been slowly progressing over the last year or two, but we need submissions more Black and Indigenous authors, more trans and non-binary authors, and more!

What has been your favourite book to work on recently? Why?

We’ve been working on the sequel to Frances Pauli’s Throwback, currently called Primal, and it’s a super fun book. More than that, Frances is definitely one of the best authors to work with. Having a good working relationship with authors is honestly just as important to us as working with a good book, because with that good relationship, even an okay book can become a favorite.


Tomorrow we start up with Oxfurred Comma, but we’ll also be featuring another one of our wonderful writers (who will actually be doing a couple of panels on Sunday!) We hope you’ll join us for both the next blog post and Oxfurred Comma.